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Iron Oxide - Red (Natural)

Natural form of oxide which can be unstable and inconsistent in its results. Ferric oxide. Iron oxides generally give a wide range of honey yellow, brownish reds, browns and blacks and are extremely popular colouring pigments for glazes and bodies. 3-8% gives yellows with yellow ochre, browns with haematite, red-browns with red synthetic, greys with iron chromate and black with magnetite or ferrous oxide. Speckled effects can be obtained with crocus martis. Warm colours obtained in lead glazes and cooler ones in lead free and alkaline glazes especially. Mottled creams can be obtained in the presence of tin. The final colour obtained with iron oxide varies with the type of glaze, firing temperature and kiln atmosphere. Iron oxide is also an active flux in glazes and even in small amounts will make a glaze noticeably more fluid. Synthetic red is very fine and produces more even shades from honey to dark brown (2-10%).

Iron Oxide - Yellow

A pure chemically processed iron which gives yellow to brown colours (3-8%). Iron hydroxide.

Kaolin Eckalite 1

Premium Grade - In some recipes known as China Clay. Primary clay which is pure, highly refractory and fires white in colour. A source of alumina and silica in glazes and a constituent of many clay bodies where whiteness is desirable e.g. bone china.

Kaolin Eckalite 2

Or Ekaglas

Standard Grade - In some recipes known as China Clay. Primary clay which is pure, highly refractory and fires white in colour. A source of alumina and silica in glazes and a constituent of many clay bodies where whiteness is desirable This is a less pure, less refined version of Eckalite 1.

Kiln Wash

Earthenware/Stoneware

Used for painting on to kiln shelves to reduce the risk of pots sticking to the shelves during gloss firing. Mix with water to thick paste and apply evenly up to 1 mm thick. Re-apply as necessary.

Lithium Carbonate

Alkaline and insoluble, a powerful flux but with a lower rate of expansion and contraction than either sodium or potassium. Used as a replacement for either of these materials, it produces a more stable glaze without affecting either the gloss or colour.

Magnesium Carabonate - Heavy

Available in either the light or heavy form, it is a flux in high temperature glazes (up to 10%) used to produce a smooth buttery surface. Used in excess a semi-matt surface may be produced and very large quantities may cause pin holing and crawling. In low temperature glazes it reduces fluidity. Used in conjunction with cobalt and manganese it produces interesting colour effects. References to light and heavy magnesium carbonates actually refer to the magnesium hydroxy carbonates hydromagnesite and dypingite (respectively)

Magnesium Carabonate - Light

Available in either the light or heavy form, it is a flux in high temperature glazes (up to 10%) used to produce a smooth buttery surface. Used in excess a semi-matt surface may be produced and very large quantities may cause pin holing and crawling. In low temperature glazes it reduces fluidity. Used in conjunction with cobalt and manganese it produces interesting colour effects. References to light and heavy magnesium carbonates actually refer to the magnesium hydroxy carbonates hydromagnesite and dypingite (respectively).

Manganese Dioxide

A fine black powder which when used in conjunction with cobalt and iron produces black. In lead and low alkaline glazes it produces a dull brown, while in high alkaline glazes along with tin, the colour is purple. In magnesium and barium glazes, colours ranging from lilac to violet will develop. With small amounts of cobalt oxide, a deep violet can be obtained. Other interesting colour effects are obtained with copper in crystalline glazes (2-5%).

Molochite

200 Mesh Calcined China Clay

An alumino-silicate refractory aggregate. It is a non-plastic form of kaolin which, due to its low shrinkage, reduces the tendency to crawl in glazes with a high clay content. Added to a body it will assist, due to its low expansion, in the formation of a fine craquelle effect in pooling glaze or frits.

Nepheline Syenite (270 Mesh)

A very white feldspar having an unusually high proportion of sodium and potassium in relation to silica. Its lower melting point makes it useful as a body and glaze flux where a lower maturing temperature and purity are required.

Nickel Oxide

A grey-green material which produces a grey colour in lead glazes and brown in glazes containing barium; in the presence of calcium the colour is tan and in high magnesium glazes a bright green. With small quantities of zinc, a steel blue develops, while with larger quantities it is lavender blue, when in stoneware glazes under reduction. Nickel is most often used to modify other colours (up to 5%).

Petalite

A secondary flux in high temperature glazes. May also be used to lower the expansion of a glaze. In small quantities it will also heighten colour.

Pottery Plaster

Gyprock Pottery Plaster is used for the manufacture of moulds for sanitary ware as well as for general casting applications. This plaster is grit free with a short setting time and is ideal for toilet and wash basin moulds. Moulds should be thoroughly cleaned and coated with a release agent where appropriate. Pour the mixed plaster into prepared moulds. Exclude air bubbles when pouring mould by bumping or rocking and pouring slurry at an appropriate point.

Rutile Flour (200 Mesh)

The mineral is obtained from beach sands and usually contains about 95-97% titanium dioxide with impurities such as iron oxide, chromium oxide and silica. In the high lead rutile glazes it usually constitutes about 10 -15% of the glaze recipe. Copper glazes containing rutile may show interesting mottled effects, whilst in high zinc glazes it develops an orange-tan colour. In lead glazes rutile tends to matt the surface, even in small amounts, but in leadless glazes much less so. In other respects, apart from colour, rutile behaves much the same as titanium dioxide.

Silica (200 Mesh)

The most common component used in glazes and bodies. This material gives glazes their glassy appearance.

Silica Sand

The most common component used in glazes and bodies. This material gives glazes their glassy appearance.

Silicon Carbide

A reduction agent used in glazes.

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